Upcoming

Sea books, soon to be washed ashore. If you are an author or a publisher, do tell me about upcoming releases. If you are a reader, I promise to have these titles in the sea library sooner or later.

Jūras grāmatas, kuras gaidāmas drīzumā! Ja esi autors vai izdevējs, dod ziņu, ko te pievienot. Ja esi lasītājs, varu apsolīt, ka agrāk vai vēlāk šīs grāmatas būs jūras bibliotēkā.

bbbook_alongpetalofthesea
Isabel Allende “A Long Petal of the Sea” JANUARY 2020

From the New York Times bestselling author of The House of the Spirits, this epic novel spanning decades and crossing continents follows two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War in search of a place to call home.

In the late 1930s, civil war grips Spain. When General Franco and his Fascists succeed in overthrowing the government, hundreds of thousands are forced to flee in a treacherous journey over the mountains to the French border. Among them is Roser, a pregnant young widow, who finds her life intertwined with that of Victor Dalmau, an army doctor and the brother of her deceased love. In order to survive, the two must unite in a marriage neither of them desires.

Together with two thousand other refugees, they embark on the SS Winnipeg, a ship chartered by the poet Pablo Neruda, to Chile: “the long petal of sea and wine and snow.” As unlikely partners, they embrace exile as the rest of Europe erupts in world war. Starting over on a new continent, their trials are just beginning, and over the course of their lives, they will face trial after trial. But they will also find joy as they patiently await the day when they will be exiles no more. Through it all, their hope of returning to Spain keeps them going. Destined to witness the battle between freedom and repression as it plays out across the world, Roser and Victor will find that home might have been closer than they thought all along.

A masterful work of historical fiction about hope, exile, and belonging, A Long Petal of the Sea shows Isabel Allende at the height of her powers.

Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Isabel Allendeis the author of a number of bestselling and critically acclaimed books, including The House of the SpiritsOf Love and ShadowsEva LunaPaula, and In the Midst of Winter. Her books have been translated into more than forty-two languages and have sold more than seventy-four million copies worldwide. She lives in California.

bbbook_weswimtotheshark
Georgie Codd “We Swim to the Shark” JANUARY 2020

Georgie Codd is scared of fish. Really, really scared. Even on dry land there’s no escape: Georgie sees sharks in the dining room, squid tentacles in the street, has nightmares of being stranded at sea.

Granny Codd understands. She has spent her life beside the water, but won’t so much as paddle in it. Georgie’s boyfriend is supportive, too, even when she decides that the answer to overcoming this fear lies in travelling to Thailand, learning to dive, and swimming with the biggest fish in the world: the massive, mighty whale shark.

Could this immersive therapy actually work? There’s only one way to find out. An anxious Georgie quits her job, leaves her life behind, and plunges into a realm of strange creatures, hidden depths, and intrepid diving adventurers. But as her quest expands across the oceans, her shark remains elusive, and everything else starts to fall apart around her.

On this journey that veers towards death and destruction, Georgie must not only track down her shark, but find her way back to the surface.

Georgie Codd has worked behind the scenes at a funeral parlour, taught English in a Himalayan nunnery, edited publications for the Tibetan Government in Exile, and shadowed drug dealers in Florida City. She is a graduate of the University of East Anglia’s Prose-writing MA, where her flash fiction won the Seth Donaldson Bursary. We Swim to the Shark is her first book.

bbbook_bluelegalities
“Blue Legalities: The Life and Laws of the Sea”, edited by Irus Braverman, Elizabeth R. Johnson, JANUARY 2020

The ocean and its inhabitants sketch and stretch our understandings of law in unexpected ways. Inspired by the blue turn in the social sciences and humanities, Blue Legalities explores how regulatory frameworks and governmental infrastructures are made, reworked, and contested in the oceans. Its interdisciplinary contributors analyze topics that range from militarization and Maori cosmologies to island building in the South China Sea and underwater robotics. Throughout, Blue Legalities illuminates the vast and unusual challenges associated with regulating the turbulent materialities and lives of the sea. Offering much more than an analysis of legal frameworks, the chapters in this volume show how the more-than-human ocean is central to the construction of terrestrial institutions and modes of governance. By thinking with the more-than-human ocean, Blue Legalities questions what we think we know—and what we don’t know—about oceans, our earthly planet, and ourselves.

Contributors. Stacy Alaimo, Amy Braun, Irus Braverman, Holly Jean Buck, Jennifer L. Gaynor, Stefan Helmreich, Elizabeth R. Johnson, Stephanie Jones, Zsofia Korosy, Berit Kristoffersen, Jessica Lehman, Astrida Neimanis, Susan Reid, Alison Rieser, Katherine G. Sammler, Astrid Schrader, Kristen L. Shake, Phil Steinberg.

bbbook_theoceanreader
“The Ocean Reader: History, Culture, Politics”, edited by Eric Paul Roorda JANUARY 2020

From prehistoric times to the present, the Ocean has been used as a highway for trade, a source of food and resources, and a space for recreation and military conquest, as well as an inspiration for religion, culture, and the arts. The Ocean Reader charts humans’ relationship to the Ocean, which has often been seen as a changeless space without a history. It collects familiar, forgotten, and previously unpublished texts from all corners of the world. Spanning antiquity to the present, the volume’s selections cover myriad topics including the slave trade, explorers from China and the Middle East, shipwrecks and castaways, Caribbean and Somali pirates, battles and U-boats, narratives of the Ocean’s origins, and the devastating effects of climate change. Containing gems of maritime writing ranging from myth, memoir, poetry, and scientific research to journalism, song lyrics, and scholarly writing, The Ocean Reader is the essential guide for all those wanting to understand the complex and long history of the Ocean that covers over 70 percent of the planet.

Eric Paul Roorda is Professor of History at Bellarmine University; coeditor of The Dominican Republic Reader and author of The Dictator Next Door: The Good Neighbor Policy and the Trujillo Regime in the Dominican Republic, 1930–1945, both also published by Duke University Press; and editor of Twain at Sea: The Maritime Writings of Samuel Langhorne Clemens.

bbbook_risingtides
“Rising Tides: Reflections for Climate Changing Times” edited by Catriona Sandilands JANUARY 2020

Ice melt; sea level rise; catastrophic weather; flooding; drought; fire; infestation; species extinction and adaptation; water shortage and contamination; intensified social inequity, migration and cultural collapse. These are but some of the changes that are not only predicted for climate changing futures, but already part of our lives in Canada. Although these transformations are global and dramatic, they are also experienced locally and particularly by people who are struggling to understand the impacts of climate change on their daily lives.

Rising Tides is a collection of short fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir and poetry addressing the past, present and future of climate change. Bringing stories about climate change—both catastrophic and subtle—closer to home, this new anthology inspires reflection, understanding, conversation and action. With more than forty purposefully written pieces, Rising Tides emphasizes the need for intimate stories and thoughtful attention, and also for a view of climate justice that is grounded in ongoing histories of colonialism and other forms of environmental and social devastation.These stories parallel the critical issues facing the planet, and imagine equitable responses for all Canadians, moving beyond denial and apocalypse and toward shared meaning and action.

Contributors to the anthology include established writers, climate change experts from different backgrounds and front-line activists: Carleigh Baker, Stephen Collis, Ashlee Cunsolo, Ann Eriksson, Rosemary Georgeson, Hiromi Goto, Laurie D. Graham, David Huebert, Sonnet L’Abbé, Timothy Leduc, Christine Lowther, Kyo Maclear, Emily McGiffin, Deborah McGregor, Philip Kevin Paul, Richard Pickard, Holly Schofield, Betsy Warland, Evelyn White, Rita Wong and many more.

Catriona Sandilands is a professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. She is a fellow of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, a former Canada Research Chair and past president of both the Association for Literature, Environment and Culture in Canada and the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (US). Cate is internationally known for her work in the environmental humanities, including three (sole and co-authored) books and over eighty scholarly and popular articles, essays and stories. In addition to Rising Tides, she is working on a book about plants and environmental philosophy (Cultivating Feminism) and a memoir about her journey to write a book about Jane Rule (The Jane Book). Cate lives and writes in Toronto, ON, and on Galiano Island, BC.

bbbooks_sharksinthetimeofsaviours
Kawai Strong Washburn “Sharks in the Time of Saviours” JANUARY 2020

A powerful debut novel that delicately blends Hawaiian myth with the broken American dream. 

In 1994 in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, seven-year-old Nainoa Flores is saved from drowning by a shiver of sharks. His family, struggling to make ends meet amidst the collapse of the sugar cane industry, hails his rescue as a sign of favour from ancient Hawaiian gods.But as time passes, this hope gives way to economic realities, forcing Nainoa and his siblings to seek salvation across the continental United States, leaving behind home and family.With a profound command of language, Washburn’s powerful debut novel examines what it means to be both of a place, and a stranger in it.

Kawai Strong Washburn was born and raised on the Hamakua coast of Hawaii. His short fiction has appeared in McSweeney’s, Electric Literature and The Best American Nonrequired Reading, among others. He has received scholarships from the Tin House and Bread Loaf writer’s workshops and has worked in software and as a climate policy advocate. He lives in California with his wife and daughters. Sharks in the Time of Saviours is his debut novel.

bbbook_theislandchild
Molly Aitken “The Island Child” JANUARY 2020

On the night of a terrible storm, Oona is cut from her mother and welcomed with joy to the remote Irish island of Inis. Not far away, on a deserted beach, a woman pushes out a boy.

Oona becomes drawn to wild Felim and his ousted mother, increasingly tangled in their erratic lives on the precipice of the island’s deeply Catholic and superstitious community. The gossips say that the mother and son are related to the fairies, and fear escalates when dark secrets are spun. As the magic of this strange boy grows, an extraordinary bond is created that will ricochet dangerously across Oona’s life.

Thirty-six years later, when her own daughter vanishes, Oona is forced to face the past she tried to escape in one last attempt to build a bridge between her and her lost child.

Woven through with the myth of Persephone, this is a haunting and magical tale of motherhood, desire, loss and the healing power of stories. The Island Child is a novel for readers of Megan Hunter, Sarah Perry, Eowyn Ivey, Edna O’Brien and Jeanette Winterson.

Molly Aitken was born in Scotland in 1991 and brought up in Ireland. She studied Literature and Classics at Galway University and has an MA in Creative Writing from Bath Spa. She was shortlisted for Writing Magazine’s fairy tale retelling prize 2016, and has a story in the Irish Imbas 2017 Short Story Collection. Currently, she works as an editor and ghostwriter and lives in Sheffield. The Island Child is her debut novel.

bbbook_surfsweatandtears
Andy Martin “Surf, Sweat and Tears: The Epic Life and Mysterious Death of Edward George William Omar Deerhurst” FEBRUARY 2020

This is the true story of Ted, Viscount Deerhurst, an aristocrat’s son who dedicated his life to becoming a professional surfer. Surfing was a means of escape, from England, from the fraught charges of nobility, from family, and, often, from his own demons. Ted was good on the board, but never made it to the very highest ranks of a sport that, like most, treats second-best as nowhere at all. He kept on surfing, ending up where all surfers go to live or die, the paradise of Hawaii. There, doomed to the inevitable, he fell in love with a dancer called Lola, who worked in a Honolulu nightclub. The problem with paradise, as he was soon to discover, is that gangsters always get there first. Lola already had a serious boyfriend, a man who went by the name of Pit Bull. Ted was given fair warning to stay away. But he had a besetting sin, for which he paid the heaviest price: He never knew when to give up.

Surf, Sweat and Tears takes us into the world of global surfing, revealing a dark side beneath the dazzling sun and cream-crested waves. Here is surf noir at its most compelling, a dystopian tale of one man’s obsessions, wiped out in a grizzly true crime.

Alongside teaching French at Cambridge University and writing a column for the Independent newspaper in the UK, Andy Martin has travelled the world as a keen surfer. He got to know Ted Deerhurst when reporting on the international circuit as surfing correspondent for the Times of London. He is the author of numerous books including: With Child: Lee Child and the Readers of Jack Reacher, The Boxer and the Goalkeeper: Sartre vs Camus, Stealing the Wave and Walking on Water.

UTS jacket.indd
Matt Gaw “Under the Stars: A Journey into Light” FEBRUARY 2020

Moonlight, starlight, the ethereal glow of snow in winter. When you turn off the electricity, other forms of night light reveal themselves.

Light pollution is everywhere. Not only is it damaging to humans and to wildlife, disrupting our natural rhythms, but it obliterates the subtler lights that have guided us for millennia.

In this beautifully written exploration, Matt Gaw ventures forth into darkness to find out exactly what we’re losing. Walking by the light of the moon in Suffolk and under the scattered buckshot of starlight in Scotland; braving the darkest depths of Dartmoor; investigating the glare of 24/7 London and the suburban sprawl of Bury St Edmunds; and, finally, rediscovering a sense of the sublime on the Isle of Coll, he finds beauty and awe, fear and wonder in the interplay between light and dark that is as old as time.

A stunning investigation of the power of light, this beautiful book is a timely and urgent reminder to reconnect with the natural world, showing how we only need to step outside to find that, in darkness, the world lights up.

Matt Gaw is a writer, journalist and naturalist who lives in Bury St Edmunds, and is the author of the acclaimed The Pull of the River: A Journey into the Wild and Watery Heart of Britain (E&T, 2017). His work has been published in the Guardian, the Telegraph and the Times. He works with the Suffolk Wildlife Trust, edits Suffolk Wildlife, currently writes a monthly country diary for the Suffolk Magazine and is a director of the Suffolk Festival of Ideas.

bbbook_themercies
Kiran Millwood Hargrave “The Mercies” FEBRUARY 2020

Beneath the sunken sun on Christmas Eve 1617, where Finnmark, Norway, scatters into its northernmost islands, twenty-year-old Maren Magnusdatter watches the sea break into a sudden and reckless storm. Forty fishermen, including her brother and father, are drowned and left broken on the rocks below. With the menfolk wiped out, the women of Vardø must fend for themselves.

Three years later, beneath a midnight sun, a sinister figure arrives in Vardø. Absalom Cornet comes from Scotland, where he burned witches in the northern isles. He brings with him his young Norwegian wife, Ursa, who is both heady with her husband’s authority, and terrified by it. In Vardø, and in Maren, Ursa sees something she has never seen before: independent women. But Absalom sees only a place untouched by God, and flooded with a mighty and terrible evil.

Inspired by the real events of the Vardø storm and the 1621 witch trials, this is a story of love, evil, and obsession, set at the everdark edge of civilisation. For readers of Burial RitesThe Miniaturist and Wolf Winter. Forthcoming from Picador (UK), Little, Brown (US), and over a dozen other territories in February 2020.

Kiran Millwood Hargrave is an award-winning poet, playwright, and novelist. Her bestselling works for children include The Girl of Ink & Stars, and have won numerous awards including the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize, the British Book Awards Children’s Book of the Year, and the Blackwell’s Children’s Book of the Year, and been shortlisted for prizes such as the Costa Children’s Book Award and the Blue Peter Best Story Award. The Mercies is her first novel for adults. Kiran lives by the river in Oxford, with her husband, artist Tom de Freston, and their rescue cat, Luna.

bbbook_akindersea

Felicity Plunkett “A Kinder Sea” FEBRUARY 2020

A Kinder Sea is Felicity Plunkett’s masterpiece in the original sense of that term- the work that most fully expresses her gifts. This collection explores the sea as sanctuary, hoard and repository. It is composed of sequences- love letters, elegies, narratives and odes. Plunkett’s combination of intensity and range is rare, as is this collection’s formal precision and emotional directness. This is an exceptional collection – a break-out work for this gifted poet.

Felicity Plunkett is an Australian poet and critic. She was poetry editor at the University of Queensland Press from 2010 to 2018. Her debut collection Vanishing Point (UQP, 2009) won the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize and was shortlisted for several other awards. She has a chapbook Seastrands (Vagabond, 2011) and is the editor of Thirty Australian Poets (UQP, 2011). Her new collection, A Kinder Sea is forthcoming.

bbbook_badisland
Stanley Donwood “Bad Island” FEBRUARY 2020

From cult graphic designer and long-time Radiohead collaborator Stanley Donwood comes a starkly beautiful graphic novel about the end of the world.

A wild seascape, a distant island, a full moon. Gradually the island grows nearer until we land on a primeval wilderness, rich in vegetation and huge, strange beasts. Time passes and man appears, with clubs, with spears, with crueller weapons still – and things do not go well for the wilderness. Civilization rises as towers of stone and metal and smoke, choking the undergrowth and the creatures who once moved through it. This is not a happy story and it will not have a happy ending.

Working in his distinctive, monochromatic lino-cut style, Stanley Donwood carves out a mesmerizing, stark parable on environmentalism and the history of humankind.

‘I’ve read lots of his stuff and it’s always good and I am in no way biased’ Thom Yorke, lead singer of Radiohead

bbbook_landofwondrouscold
Gillen D’Arcy Wood “Land of Wondrous Cold: The Race to Discover Antarctica and Unlock the Secrets of its Ice” MARCH 2020

A gripping history of the polar continent, from the great discoveries of the nineteenth century to modern scientific breakthroughs.

Antarctica, the ice kingdom hosting the South Pole, looms large in the human imagination. The secrets of this vast frozen desert have long tempted explorers, but its brutal climate and glacial shores notoriously resist human intrusion. Land of Wondrous Cold tells a gripping story of the pioneering nineteenth-century voyages, when British, French, and American commanders raced to penetrate Antarctica’s glacial rim for unknown lands beyond. These intrepid Victorian explorers―James Ross, Dumont D’Urville, and Charles Wilkes―laid the foundation for our current understanding of Terra Australis Incognita.

Today, the white continent poses new challenges, as scientists race to uncover Earth’s climate history, which is recorded in the south polar ice and ocean floor, and to monitor the increasing instability of the Antarctic ice cap, which threatens to inundate coastal cities worldwide. Interweaving the breakthrough research of the modern Ocean Drilling Program with the dramatic discovery tales of their Victorian forerunners, Gillen D’Arcy Wood describes Antarctica’s role in a planetary drama of plate tectonics, climate change, and species evolution stretching back more than thirty million years. An original, multifaceted portrait of the polar continent emerges, illuminating our profound connection to Antarctica in its past, present, and future incarnations.

A deep-time history of monumental scale, Land of Wondrous Cold brings the remotest of worlds within close reach―an Antarctica vital to both planetary history and human fortunes.

Gillen D’Arcy Wood is professor of environmental humanities at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he serves as associate director of the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and the Environment. He is the author of Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World (Princeton). Originally from Australia, he lives in Urbana, Illinois, with his wife and two children.

bbbook_ocean


Steve Mentz “Ocean” MARCH 2020

Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things.

The ocean comprises the largest object on our planet. Steve Mentz’s Ocean shows us that retelling human history from an oceanic rather than terrestrial point of view disorients familiar stories and creates a new sense of our relationship with nature. Unlike conventional stories that describe civilizations made through agricultural settlement or violent conquest, in the ocean humans labor more vulnerably as either sailors or swimmers. Our engagement with the planet’s waters can be destructive, as with today’s deluge of plastic trash and acidification, but the discrepancy between small bodies and vast seas also emphasizes the frailty of human experience.

Embracing the omnipresence of salt water in human history, Ocean combines history, myth, poetry, and narrative in order to revise the human story on a nonhuman scale.

From ancient stories of shipwrecked sailors to the containerized future of 21st-century commerce, Ocean splashes the histories we thought we knew into an unfamiliar context.

Steve Mentz is Professor of English at St John’s University, USA. He is the author of three books, including Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550 – 1719 (2015), and the editor of four books. His maritime research has been supported by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the John Carter Brown Library, Mystic Seaport, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Maritime Museum in London.]

bbbook_stkilda
Elisabeth Gifford “The Lost Lights of St Kilda” MARCH 2020

1927: When Fred Lawson takes a summer job on St Kilda, little does he realise that he has joined the last community to ever live on that beautiful, isolated island. Only three years later, St Kilda will be evacuated, the islanders near-dead from starvation. But for Fred, that summer – and the island woman, Chrissie, whom he falls in love with – becomes the very thing that sustains him in the years ahead.

1940: Fred has been captured behind enemy lines in France and finds himself in a prisoner-of-war camp. Beaten and exhausted, his thoughts return to the island of his youth and the woman he loved and lost. When Fred makes his daring escape, prompting a desperate journey across occupied territory, he is sustained by one thought only: finding his way back to her.

The Lost Lights of St Kilda is a sweeping love story that will cross oceans and decades. It is a moving and deeply vivid portrait of two lovers, a desolate island, and the extraordinary power of hope in the face of darkness.

bbbook_talesoftwoplanets
“Tales of Two Planets: Stories of Climate Change and Inequality in a Divided World” edited by John Freeman APRIL 2020

Building from his acclaimed anthology Tales of Two Americas, beloved writer and editor John Freeman draws together some of our greatest writers from around the world to help us see how the environmental crisis is hitting some of the most vulnerable communities where they live.

In the past five years, John Freeman, previously editor of Granta, has launched a celebrated international literary magazine, Freeman’s, and compiled two acclaimed anthologies that deal with income inequality as it is experienced, first in New York and then throughout the United States. In the course of this work, one major theme has come up repeatedly: how climate change is making already dire inequalities much worse, devastating further the already devastated. The effects of global warming are especially disruptive in less well-off nations, sending refugees to the US and elsewhere in the wealthier world, where they often encounter the problems that perennially face outsiders: lack of access to education, health care, decent housing, employment, and even basic nutrition.

But the problems of climate change are not restricted to those from the less developed world. American citizens are suffering too, as the stories of distress resulting from recent hurricanes testify: People who can’t sell their home because the building is on a flood plain, people who get displaced and cannot find work, and more. And this doesn’t even take on board the situation in much of the Caribbean, or south of the Rio Grande in Mexico and Central America.

Galvanized by his conversations with writers and activists around the world, Freeman has engaged with some of today’s most eloquent writers, many of whom hail from the places under the most acute stress. The response has been extraordinary: a literary all-points bulletin of fiction, essays, poems, and reportage. Margaret Atwood conjures with a dystopian future in three remarkable poems. Lauren Groff takes us to Florida; Edwidge Danticat to Haiti; Tahmima Anam to Bangladesh. Eka Kurniawan takes us to Indonesia and Chinelo Okparanta to Nigeria. As the anthology unfolds, clichés fall away and we are brought closer to the real, human truth of what is happening to our world, and the dystopia to which we are heading. These are news stories with the emphasis on story, about events that should be found in the headlines but often are not, about the most important crisis of our times.

bbbook_islanddreams 
Gavin Francis “Island Dreams: Mapping an Obsession” May 2020

In Island Dreams, Gavin Francis journeys into our collective fascination with islands. He blends stories of his own travels with great voyages from literature and philosophical exploration, and he examines the place of islands and isolation in our collective consciousness.

Comparing the life of freedom of thirty years of extraordinary travel – from the Faroe Islands to the Aegean, from the Galapagos to the Andaman Islands – with a life of responsibility as a doctor, community member and parent approaching middle age, Island Dreams riffs on the twinned poles of rest and motion, independence and attachment, never more relevant than in today’s perennially connected world.

Beautifully illustrated with maps throughout, this is a celebration of human adventures in the world and within our minds.

Gavin Francis is an award-winning writer and GP. He is the author of four books of non-fiction, including Adventures in Human Being, which was a Sunday Times bestseller and won the Saltire Scottish Non-Fiction Book of the Year Award, and Empire Antarctica, which won Scottish Book of the Year in the SMIT Awards and was shortlisted for both the Ondaatje and Costa Prizes. He has written for the Guardian, The Times, the New York Review of Books and the London Review of Books. His work is published in eighteen languages. He lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.

bbbook_ghostspecies
James Bradley “Ghost Species” May 2020

When scientist Kate Garrard joins a secretive project to re-engineer the climate by resurrecting extinct species she becomes enmeshed in another, even more clandestine program to recreate our long-lost relatives, the Neanderthals. But when the first of the children, a girl called Eve, is born, Kate cannot bear the thought her growing up in a laboratory, and so elects to abduct her, and raise her alone.

Set against a backdrop of hastening climate catastrophe, Ghost Species is an exquisitely beautiful and deeply affecting exploration of connection and loss in the age of planetary trauma. For as Eve grows to adulthood she and Kate must face the question of who and what she is. Is she natural or artificial? Human or non-human? And perhaps most importantly, as civilization unravels around them, is Eve the ghost species, or are we?

James Bradley is the author of four novels, WrackThe Deep FieldThe Resurrectionist and Clade, and a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus. His books have won or been shortlisted for a number of major Australian and international literary awards and have been widely translated.