Upcoming

Sea books, soon to be washed ashore. If you are an author or a publisher, do tell me about upcoming releases. If you are a reader, I promise to have these titles in the sea library sooner or later.

Jūras grāmatas, kuras gaidāmas drīzumā! Ja esi autors vai izdevējs, dod ziņu, ko te pievienot. Ja esi lasītājs, varu apsolīt, ka agrāk vai vēlāk šīs grāmatas būs jūras bibliotēkā.

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Charlotte McConaghy “Migrations” AUGUST 2020

For fans of Flight Behavior and Station Eleven, a novel set on the brink of catastrophe, as a young woman chases the world’s last birds–and her own final chance for redemption.

Franny Stone has always been a wanderer. By following the ocean’s tides and the birds that soar above, she can forget the losses that have haunted her life. But when the wild she loves begins to disappear, Franny can no longer wander without a destination. She arrives in remote Greenland with one purpose: to find the world’s last flock of Arctic terns and track their final migration. She convinces Ennis Malone, captain of the Saghani, to take her onboard, winning over his eccentric crew with promises that the birds will lead them to fish.

As the Saghani fights its way south, Franny’s dark history begins to unspool. Battered by night terrors, accumulating a pile of unsent letters, and obsessed with pursuing the terns at any cost, Franny is full of secrets. When her quest threatens the safety of the entire crew, Franny must ask herself what she is really running toward–and running from.Propelled by a narrator as fierce and fragile as the terns she is following, Charlotte McConaghy’s Migrations is both an ode to our threatened world and a breathtaking page-turner about the lengths we will go for the people we love.

Charlotte McConaghy is an author and screenwriter based in Sydney, Australia. Migrations is her U.S. debut.Though she grew up in Australia, it was while roaming along the Irish coastline that the first germ of an idea for Migrations was born. It wasn’t long before her passion for wildlife and her distress over the disastrous extinction crisis faced by the world today collided in the story of a woman’s pursuit of the world’s last birds.

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Hannah Boast “Hydrofictions: Water, Power and Politics in Israeli and Palestinian Literature” AUGUST 2020

Water is a major global issue that will shape our future. Rarely, however, has water been the subject of literary critical attention. This book identifies water as a crucial new topic of literary and cultural analysis at a critical moment for the world’s water resources, focusing on the urgent context of Israel/Palestine. It argues for the necessity of recognising water’s vital importance in understanding contemporary Israeli and Palestinian literature, showing that water is as culturally significant as that much more obvious object of nationalist attention, the land. In doing so, it offers new insights into Israeli and Palestinian literature and politics, and into the role of culture in an age of environmental crisis. Hydrofictions shows that how we imagine water is inseparable from how we manage it. This book is urgent and necessary reading for students and scholars in Middle East Studies, postcolonial ecocriticism, the environmental humanities and anyone invested in the future of the world’s water.

“This highly original monograph will be field-defining in both environmental humanities and postcolonial studies. Analysis of literary representations of water in postcolonial literature has often been neglected in contrast to representations of land, and this book makes a crucial intervention in redressing that marginalization and constructing new theoretical frameworks through which to understand literary mediations of water conflict. At the same time, the book’s comparative analysis of Israeli and Palestinian “hydrofiction” offers a vital new understanding of the dynamics of hydro-apartheid, hydro-colonialism, and infrastructural violence, while bringing less familiar, but valuable, texts to light.” – Dr. Sharae Deckard, University College Dublin

Hannah Boast is Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at University of Warwick

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“Antlers of Water: Writing on the Nature and Environment of Scotland” edited by Kathleen Jamie AUGUST 2020

The first ever collection of contemporary Scottish writing on nature and landscape, Antlers of Water showcases the diversity and radicalism of new Scottish nature writing today. Edited, curated and introduced by the award-winning Kathleen Jamie, and featuring prose, poetry and photography, this inspiring collection takes us from walking to wild swimming, from red deer to pigeons and wasps, from remote islands to back gardens.

With contributions from Amy Liptrot, Malachy Tallack, Chitra Ramaswamy, Jim Crumley, Amanda Thomson, Karine Polwart and many more, Antlers of Water urges us to renegotiate our relationship with the more-than-human world, in writing which is by turns celebratory, radical and political.

Kathleen Jamie is an award-winning Scottish poet and essayist, and Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Stirling. Her writing is rooted in Scottish landscape and culture, as shown in her acclaimed essay collections Findings and Sightlines. Her award-winning poetry collections include The Tree House and The Bonniest Companie. In 2018, Jamie was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She lives in Scotland.

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Sarah Moss “Summerwater” AUGUST 2020

‘Sharp, searching, thoroughly imagined, utterly of the moment . . . it throws much contemporary writing into the shade’ Hilary Mantel

From the acclaimed author of Ghost WallSummerwater is a devastating story told over twenty-four hours in the Scottish highlands, and a searing exploration of our capacity for both kinship and cruelty in these divided times.

On the longest day of the summer, twelve people sit cooped up with their families in a faded Scottish cabin park. The endless rain leaves them with little to do but watch the other residents.

A woman goes running up the Ben as if fleeing; a retired couple reminisce about neighbours long since moved on; a teenage boy braves the dark waters of the loch in his red kayak. Each person is wrapped in their own cares but increasingly alert to the makeshift community around them. One particular family, a mother and daughter without the right clothes or the right manners, starts to draw the attention of the others. Tensions rise and all watch on, unaware of the tragedy that lies ahead as night finally falls.

‘Nothing escapes her sly humour and brilliant touch. Deft and brimming with life, Summerwater is a novel of endless depth. A masterpiece.’ Jessie Burton, author of The Miniaturist

Sarah Moss is the author of seven novels and a memoir of her year living in Iceland, Names for the Sea, shortlisted for the RSL Ondaatje Prize. Her novels are Cold EarthNight WakingBodies of Light (shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize), Signs for Lost Children (shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize), The Tidal Zone (shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize) and Ghost Wall, which was shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction in 2019. Sarah was born in Glasgow and grew up in the north of England. After moving between Oxford, Canterbury, Reykjavik and West Cornwall, she now lives in the Midlands and is Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Warwick.

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Patrik Svensson “The Gospel of the Eels: A father, a son and the world’s most enigmatic fish” AUGUST 2020

Translated by Agnes Broomé

I can’t recall us ever talking about anything other than eels and how to best catch them, down there by the stream. Actually, I can’t remember us speaking at all. Maybe because we never did.

The European eel, Anguilla anguilla, is one of the strangest creatures nature ever created. Remarkably little is known about the eel, even today. What we do know is that it’s born as a tiny willow-leaf shaped larva in the Sargasso Sea, travels on the ocean currents toward the coasts of Europe – a journey of about four thousand miles that takes at least two years. Upon arrival, it transforms itself into a glass eel and then into a yellow eel before it wanders up into fresh water. It lives a solitary life, hiding from both light and science, for ten, twenty, fifty years, before migrating back to the sea in the autumn, morphing into a silver eel and swimming all the way back to the Sargasso Sea, where it breeds and dies.

And yet . . . There is still so much we don’t know about eels. No human has ever seen eels reproduce; no one can give a complete account of the eel’s metamorphoses or say why they are born and die in the Sargasso Sea; no human has even seen a mature eel in the Sargasso Sea. Ever. And now the eel is disappearing, and we don’t know exactly why.

What we do know is that eels and their mysterious lives captivate us.

This is the basis for The Gospel of the Eels, Patrik Svensson’s quite unique natural science memoir; his ongoing fascination with this secretive fish, but also the equally perplexing and often murky relationship he shared with his father, whose only passion in life was fishing for this obscure creature.

Through the exploration of eels in literature (Günter Grass and Graham Swift feature, amongst others) and the history of science (we learn about Aristotle’s and Sigmund Freud’s complicated relationships with eels) as well as modern marine biology (Rachel Carson and others) we get to know this peculiar animal. In this exploration, we also learn about the human condition, life and death, through natural science and nature writing at its very best.

As Patrik Svensson concludes: ‘by writing about eels, I have in some ways found my way home again.’

“What a joy! Patrick Svensson’s sinuous weaving of natural history, philosophy, psychology and autobiography is as compelling and rewarding as a silver eel’s return to the Sargasso Sea. I loved every moment.” Isabella Tree, author of Wilding

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Ann Lingard “The Fresh and the Salt: The Story of the Solway” SEPTEMBER 2020

The Fresh and the Salt is a story of the Solway Firth and its origins and ever-changing margins. This is a story that has influenced other stories, of the lives of non-humans – animals and plants and micro-organisms – and humans, that occupy the edges. The perspective ranges from satellite views to the microscopic, even the molecular.

Firths and estuaries are liminal places, where land meets sea and tides meet freshwater. Their unique ecosystems support a huge range of marine and other wildlife: human activity too is profoundly influenced by their waters and shores.

The Solway Firth – the crooked finger of water that both unites and divides Scotland and England – is a beautiful yet unpredictable place and one of the least-industrialised natural large estuaries in Europe. Its history, geology and turbulent character have long affected the way its inhabitants, both human and non-human, have learnt to live along and within its ever-changing margins.

“Like a hungry gull, Ann Lingard explores her beloved Solway shoreline for every living detail that catches her eye, from its tiny mudshrimps to the shape of its tidal silts. She lets no detail escape her notice and in so doing has created a portrait of this nation-cleaving water that is as broad and deep as the estuary itself. A wonderful addition to the literature of place.” MARK COCKER, author and naturalist

“Beautiful, intensely visual prose, born from deep intimacy with subtle borderlands: land and sea, England and Scotland, people and environments. Lingard expertly probes the margins for their hidden riches”. DAVID GANGE, author of The Frayed Atlantic Edge

Ann Lingard spent her childhood in Cornwall. After living and working in various places including Cambridge, Glasgow, Oxford and Oregon, she and her husband now manage a smallholding in North-west Cumbria, within sight of the Solway Firth. Having left academia and research to write and broadcast, she has subsequently published six novels and several short stories and has written and spoken a great deal about the countryside and shore.

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Linn Ullmann “Unquiet” SEPTEMBER 2020

He is a renowned Swedish filmmaker and has a plan for everything. She is his daughter, by the actress he directed and once loved. Each summer of her childhood, the daughter visits the father at his remote Faro island home on the edge of the Baltic Sea.

Now that she’s grown up – a writer, with children of her own – and he’s in his eighties, they envision writing a book together, about old age, language, memory and loss. She will ask the questions. He will answer them. The tape recorder will record.

But it’s winter now and old age has caught up with him in ways neither could have foreseen. And when the father is gone, only memories, images and words — both remembered and recorded – remain. And from these the daughter begins to write her own story, in the pages which become this book.

Heart-breaking and spell-binding, Unquiet is a seamless blend of fiction and memoir in pursuit of elemental truths about how we live, love, lose and age.

Linn Ullmann is the author of six award-winning and critically acclaimed novels. Her work has been published in more than thirty languages, and adapted for both stage and screen. Unquiet has received multiple awards, spent more than a year on the Scandinavian bestseller lists and was heralded as a modern classic in Norway. In 2017 Ullmann received the Doubloug Prize from the Swedish Academy for her body of work. She lives in Oslo with her family. 

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Peter Van den Ende “The Wanderer” OCTOBER 2020

A little boat sets out to sea and begins its voyage toward home. To get there it must travel across many strange, beautiful oceanscapes, full of fantastic creatures and deadly monsters, swept by terrifying storms and sailed by mysterious ships. Can the Wanderer pick a path through all these perils to a safe harbour? This beautifully illustrated, wordless picturebook is a gateway into a captivating marine fantasy world.

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Robert Macfarlane, Jackie Morris “The Lost Spells” OCTOBER 2020

Kindred in spirit to The Lost Words but fresh in its form, The Lost Spells is a pocket-sized treasure that introduces a beautiful new set of natural spell-poems and artwork by beloved creative duo Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris.

As in The Lost Words, these “spells” take their subjects from relatively commonplace, and yet underappreciated, animals, birds, trees and flowers — from Barn Owl to Red Fox, Grey Seal to Silver Birch, Jay to Jackdaw. But they break out of the triptych format of The Lost Words, finding new shapes, new spaces and new voices with which to conjure.

Written to be read aloud, painted in brushstrokes that call to the forest, field, riverbank and also to the heart, The Lost Spells summons back what is often lost from sight and care, and inspires protection and action on behalf of the natural world. Above all, it celebrates a sense of wonder, bearing witness to nature’s power to amaze, console and bring joy.

Robert Macfarlane is the bestselling author of Mountains of the Mind, The Wild Places, The Old Ways, Landmarks and Underland. He is also co-creator of The Lost Words, with Jackie Morris, and Ness, with Stanley Donwood. His work has won multiple awards including most recently the Wainwright Book Prize 2019. He is a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and writes on environmentalism, literature and travel for publications including the Guardian, the Sunday Times and The New York Times.

Jackie Morris has written and illustrated over forty children’s books, including Song of the Golden Hare and Tell Me A Dragon, which have collectively sold more than a million copies worldwide. She is co-creator of The Lost Words, for which she won a Kate Greenaway Medal, and most recently introduced and illustrated a new edition of Barbara Newhall Follett’s lost classic The House Without Windows.

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Gavin Francis “Island Dreams: Mapping an Obsession” OCTOBER 2020

In Island Dreams, Gavin Francis examines our collective fascination with islands. He blends stories of his own travels with psychology, philosophy and great voyages from literature, shedding new light on the importance of islands and isolation in our collective consciousness.

Comparing the life of freedom of thirty years of extraordinary travel from the Faroe Islands to the Aegean, from the Galapagos to the Andaman Islands with a life of responsibility as a doctor, community member and parent approaching middle age, Island Dreams riffs on the twinned poles of rest and motion, independence and attachment, never more relevant than in today’s perennially connected world.

Illustrated with maps throughout, this is a celebration of human adventures in the world and within our minds.

“An intoxicating voyage during which maps become fictions and fictions verifiable facts. Myths of returning and older legends carry us out in a shared fugue of obsession and release. Here is a worthy companion to the dream labyrinths of Borges” Iain Sinclair