Upcoming

Sea books, soon to be washed ashore. If you are an author or a publisher, do tell me about upcoming releases. If you are a reader, I promise to have these titles in the sea library sooner or later.

Jūras grāmatas, kuras gaidāmas drīzumā! Ja esi autors vai izdevējs, dod ziņu, ko te pievienot. Ja esi lasītājs, varu apsolīt, ka agrāk vai vēlāk šīs grāmatas būs jūras bibliotēkā.

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Caroline Crampton “The Way to the Sea: The Forgotten Histories of Thames Estuary” JUNE 2019

“You won’t find a more elegantly written guide to this strange, little regarded and generally unloved section of the British landscape” Christopher Hart in the Literary Review

“Caroline Crampton’s atmospheric and movingly written exploration of the Thames, and that once-industrial estuary, is especially illuminating on the soul of the river” Sinclair McKay in the Spectator

Caroline Crampton was born on the Thames Estuary to parents who had sailed there from South Africa in the early 1980s. Having grown up with seafaring legs and a desire to explore, Caroline is both a knowledgeable guide to the most hidden-away parts of this overlooked and unfashionable part of the country, and a persuasive advocate for its significance, both historically and culturally.

As one of the key entrances and exits to England, the estuary has been pivotal to London’s economic fortunes and in defining its place in the world. It has also been the entry point for immigrants for generations, yet it has an ambivalent relationship with newcomers, and UKIP’s popularity in the area is on the rise. As Caroline navigates the waters of the estuary, she also seeks out its stories: empty warehouses and arsenals; the Thames barrier, which guards the safety of Londoners more precariously than we might; ship wrecks still inhabited by the ghosts of the drowned; vast Victorian pumping stations which continue to carry away the capital’s sewage; the river banks, layered with archaeological Anglo-Saxon treasures; literature inspired by its landscape; beacons used for centuries to guide boats through the dark and murky waterways of the estuary; the eerie Maunsell army forts – 24 metre high towers of concrete and steel which were built on concealed sandbanks at the far reaches of the estuary during the Second World War and designed to spot (and shoot) at incoming enemy planes; and the estuary’s wildlife and shifting tidal moods.

Caroline Crampton is a writer and editor who contributes regularly to the Guardian, the Mail on Sunday and the New Humanist. She has appeared as a broadcaster on Newsnight, Sky News and BBC Radio 4. This is her first book.

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Ruth Kassinger “Bloom: From Food to Fuel, the Epic Story of How Algae Can Save Our World” JUNE 2019

“Engaging, occasionally icky, and deeply informative” Elizabeth Kolbert

“Full of delights and surprises …This is a beautiful evocation of the many ways that our past and future are entangled in their emerald strands” David George Haskell, author of Pulitzer Prize-finalist, The Forest Unseen

A fascinating exploration of a hidden part of our lives – with the potential to be the future of our rapidly changing world. Say “algae” and most people think of pond scum. What they don’t know is that without algae, none of us would exist.

There are as many algae on Earth as stars in the universe, and they have been essential to life on our planet for eons. Algae created the Earth we know today, with its oxygen-rich atmosphere, abundant oceans, and coral reefs. Crude oil is made of dead algae, and algae are the ancestors of all plants.

Today, seaweed production is a multi-billion dollar industry, with algae hard at work to make your sushi, beer, paint, toothpaste, shampoo and so much more. Delving into science and history, Ruth Kassinger takes readers on a global journey from the seaweed farmers in South Korea and laverbread champions in Pembrokeshire. Everywhere, she talks to algae innovators working toward a sustainable future: to scientists using it to clean the dead zones in our waterways, to the entrepreneurs fighting to bring algae fuel and plastics to market.

Full of surprising science and history, and even a few recipes, Bloom will overturn everything you thought you knew about algae. As Ruth Kassinger concludes “They created us, sustain us, and if we’re both clever and wise, they can help save us.”

RUTH KASSINGER writes about the intersection of gardening, history, and science. In addition to her several books, Ruth has written for the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, Health, National Geographic Explorer, and other publications.

“Kassinger is a witty and affable guide throughout this globetrotting celebration of an overlooked life form” Thor Hanson, author of Buzz, The Triumph of Seeds, and Feathers

“Kassinger turns an obscure subject into delightful reading…. an informative and charming primer to ‘the world’s most powerful engines’” Publishers’ Weekly

“Fun and fascinating … Powerful and optimistic …Thorough but not dense, informative but never boring—a delight from start to finish.” Kirkus Starred Review

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Julian Hoffman “Irreplaceable: The Fight to Save Our Wild Places” JUNE 2019

For readers of George Monbiot, Mark Cocker and Robert Macfarlane – an urgent and lyrical account of endangered places around the globe and the people fighting to save them.

All across the world, irreplaceable habitats are under threat. Unique ecosystems of plants and animals are being destroyed by human intervention. From the tiny to the vast, from marshland to meadow, and from Kent to Glasgow to India to America, they are disappearing.

Irreplaceable is more than a love letter to the haunting beauty of these landscapes and the nightingales, lynxes, hornbills, redwoods and elephant seals that call them home. It is also a timely account of the vital connections between humans and wildlife, uniting people to save these special places from extinction.

From local communities and grassroots campaigners to professional ecologists and academics, Julian Hoffman traces conservation stories around the globe, exploring treasured coral reefs, ancient woodland, tallgrass prairie and urban allotments. And in the process, he asks what a deep emotional connection to place offers us – culturally, socially and psychologically. In this rigorous, intimate and impassioned account, he presents a powerful call to arms in the face of unconscionable natural destruction.

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Anne de Courcy “Chanel’s Riviera: Life, Love and the Struggle for Survival
on the Côte d’Azur, 1930–1944″ JUNE 2019

Far from worrying about the onset of war, in the spring of 1938 the burning question on the French Riviera was whether one should curtsey to the Duchess of Windsor. Few of those who had settled there thought much about what was going on in the rest of Europe. It was a golden, glamorous life, far removed from politics or conflict.

Featuring a sparkling cast of artists, writers and historical figures including Winston Churchill, Daisy Fellowes, Salvador Dalí, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Eileen Gray and Edith Wharton, with the enigmatic Coco Chanel at its heart, CHANEL’S RIVIERA is a captivating account of a period that saw some of the deepest extremes of luxury and terror in the whole of the twentieth century.

From Chanel’s first summer at her Roquebrune villa La Pausa (in the later years with her German lover) amid the glamour of the pre-war parties and casinos in Antibes, Nice and Cannes to the horrors of evacuation and the displacement of thousands of families during the Second World War, CHANEL’S RIVIERA explores the fascinating world of the Cote d’Azur elite in the 1930s and 1940s. Enriched with much original research, it is social history that brings the experiences of both rich and poor, protected and persecuted, to vivid life.

Anne de Courcy is the author of thirteen widely acclaimed works of social history and biography, including THE HUSBAND HUNTERS, THE FISHING FLEET, THE VICEROY’S DAUGHTERS and DEBS AT WAR. In the 1970s she was Woman’s Editor on the LONDON EVENING NEWS and in the 1980s she was a regular feature-writer for the EVENING STANDARD. She is also a former features writer and reviewer for the DAILY MAIL.

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David Gange “The Frayed Atlantic Edge: A Historian’s Journey from Shetland to the Channel” JULY 2019 

“This is the book that has been wanting to be written for decades: the ragged fringe of Britain as a laboratory for the human spirit, challenging, beautiful, a place where sea and land are deeply interpenetrated, often materially impoverished and half obscured by a mawkish romanticism, but actually rich and inevitably complex: and here is the man to do it – physically resourceful, articulate, clear-eyed, informed, attentive to the realities, and crucially at home in all the elements.  A book reliant in the end on one key fact: edges are revelatory.” Adam Nicolson, winner of the Wainwright Prize 2018

The story of a breathtaking kayak journey along the weather-ravaged coasts of Atlantic Britain and Ireland, undertaken by a leading historian and nature writer. In a book of staggering range and beauty, read how wind, rock and ocean have shaped the diverse communities of coastal Scotland, Ireland, Wales and Cornwall.

Over the course of a year, leading historian and nature writer David Gange kayaked the weather-ravaged coasts of Atlantic Britain and Ireland from north to south: every cove, sound, inlet, island. The story of his journey is one of staggering adventure, range and beauty. And one which reveals how the similar ingredients of wind, rock and ocean have been transformed into wildly different Atlantic cultures in coast Scotland, Ireland, Wales and Cornwall by divergent processes of history. For too long, Gang argues, the significance of coasts has been underestimated, and the potential of small boats as tools to make sense of these histories rarely explored. This book seeks to put this imbalance right.

Paddling alone in sun and storms, among dozens of whales and countless seabirds, Gange and his kayak travelled through a Shetland summer, Scottish winter and Irish spring before reaching Wales and Cornwall.

Sitting low in the water, as did millions in eras when coasts were the main arteries of trade and communication, Gange describes, in captivating prose and loving detail, the experiences of kayaking, coastal living and historical discovery. Drawing on the archives of islands and coastal towns, as well as their vast poetic literatures in many languages, he shows that the neglected histories of these stunning regions are of real importance in reconceptualising both the past and the future of the whole archipelago. It is a history of Britain and Ireland like no other.

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Henry Beston “The Outermost House: A Year of Life on the Great Beach of Cape Cod” republished JULY 2019

With an introduction by Philip Hoare

A fragment of land in open ocean, the outermost beach of Cape Cod lies battered by winds and waves. It was here that the writer-naturalist Henry Beston spent a year in a tiny, two-roomed wooden house built on a solitary dune, writing his rapturous account of the changing seasons amid a vast, bright world of sea, sand and sky.

Transforming the natural world into something mysterious, elemental and transcendent, Beston describes soaring clouds of migrating birds and butterflies; the primal sounds of the booming sea; luminous plankton washed ashore like stardust; the long-buried, blackened skeleton of an ancient shipwreck rising from the dunes during a winter storm; a single eagle in the endless blue.

With its rhythmic, incantatory language and its heightened sensory power, The Outermost House is an American classic that changed writing about the wild: a hymn to ancient, eternal patterns of life and creation.

Long out of print in the UK, The Outermost House is a vital precursor to today’s prominent nature writers. Impassioned and richly layered, it is a matchless evocation of the spirit of a place and the enduring appeal of the wild.

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Laura Cumming “On Chapel Sands: My mother and other missing persons” JULY 2019

Uncovering the mystery of her mother’s disappearance as a child: Laura Cumming, prize winning author and art critic, takes a closer look at her family story.

In the autumn of 1929, a small child was kidnapped from a Lincolnshire beach. Five agonising days went by before she was found in a nearby village. The child remembered nothing of these events and nobody ever spoke of them at home. It was another fifty years before she even learned of the kidnap.

The girl became an artist and had a daughter, art writer Laura Cumming. Cumming grew up enthralled by her mother’s strange tales of life in a seaside hamlet of the 1930s, and of the secrets and lies perpetuated by a whole community. So many puzzles remained to be solved. Cumming began with a few criss-crossing lives in this fraction of English coast — the postman, the grocer, the elusive baker — but soon her search spread right out across the globe as she discovered just how many lives were affected by what happened that day on the beach — including her own.

On Chapel Sands is a book of mystery and memoir. Two narratives run through it: the mother’s childhood tale; and Cumming’s own pursuit of the truth. Humble objects light up the story: a pie dish, a carved box, an old Vick’s jar. Letters, tickets, recipe books, even the particular slant of a copperplate hand give vital clues. And pictures of all kinds, from paintings to photographs, open up like doors to the truth. Above all, Cumming discovers how to look more closely at the family album — with its curious gaps and missing persons — finding crucial answers, captured in plain sight at the click of a shutter.

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Lara Maiklem “Mudlarking: Lost and Found on the River Thames” AUGUST 2019

For thousands of years human beings have been losing their possessions and dumping their rubbish in the River Thames, making it the longest and most varied archaeological site in the world. For those in the know, the muddy stretches provide a tangible link with the past, a connection to the natural world, and an oasis of calm in a chaotic city.

Lara Maiklem left the countryside for London in her twenties. At first enticed by the city, she soon found herself cut adrift, yearning for the solace she had known growing up among nature.

Down on the banks of the River Thames, fifteen years ago, she discovered mudlarking: the act of scavenging in the mud for items discarded by past generations of Londoners. Since then her days have been dedicated to and dictated by the tides, in pursuit of the objects that the river unearths: from Neolithic flints to Roman hair pins, medieval shoe buckles to Tudor buttons, Georgian clay pipes to discarded war medals.

Moving from the river’s tidal origins in the west of the city to the point where it reaches the sea in the east, Mudlarking is the story of the Thames and its people as seen through these objects. A fascinating search for peace through solitude and history, it brings the voices of long-forgotten Londoners to life.

Lara Maiklem has been fossicking since she was a child, growing up on her family’s farm just out of the reach of London. It was a habit she took with her when she finally succumbed to the bright lights of the city in the early 1990s and what eventually led her down to the foreshore of the river Thames. Her obsession with mudlarking, and subsequent collection of weird and wonderful objects, grew steadily over the years and in 2012, just after the birth of her twins, she began sharing her finds and exploits on Facebook under the name of London Mudlark. She now shares the hidden side of one of the world’s most famous rivers with thousands of people all around the world. In 2015 she followed the Thames out of London and now lives on the Kent coast within easy reach of the river, which she visits as regularly as the tides permit. This is her first book.

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Benjamin Myers “The Offing” AUGUST 2019

One summer following the Second World War, Robert Appleyard sets out on foot from his Durham village. Sixteen and the son of a coal miner, he makes his way across the northern countryside until he reaches the former smuggling village of Robin Hood’s Bay. There he meets Dulcie, an eccentric, worldly, older woman who lives in a ramshackle cottage facing out to sea.

Staying with Dulcie, Robert’s life opens into one of rich food, sea-swimming, sunburn and poetry. The two come from different worlds, yet as the summer months pass, they form an unlikely friendship that will profoundly alter their futures.

Benjamin Myers was born in Durham in 1976. His novel The Gallows Pole received a Roger Deakin Award and won the Walter Scott Prize for historical fiction. Beastings won the Portico Prize for Literature and Pig Iron won the Gordon Burn Prize, whileRichard was a Sunday Times Book of the Year. He has also published poetry, crime novels and short fiction, while his journalism has appeared in publications including, among others, the GuardianNew StatesmanCaught by the River and New Scientist. He lives in the Upper Calder Valley, West Yorkshire.

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Kathleen Jamie “Surfacing” SEPTEMBER 2019

Under the ravishing light of an Alaskan sky, objects are spilling from the thawing tundra linking a Yup’ik village to its hunter-gatherer past. In the shifting sand dunes of a Scottish shoreline, impressively preserved hearths and homes of Neolithic farmers are uncovered. In a grandmother’s disordered mind, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a ‘mither who was kind’.

In this luminous new essay collection, acclaimed author Kathleen Jamie visits archeological sites and mines her own memories – of her grandparents, of youthful travels – to explore what surfaces and what reconnects us to our past. As always she looks to the natural world for her markers and guides. Most movingly, she considers, as her father dies and her children leave home, the surfacing of an older, less tethered sense of herself.

Surfacing offers a profound sense of time passing and an antidote to all that is instant, ephemeral, unrooted.

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Tiffany Francis “Dark Skies: A Journey into the Wild Night” SEPTEMBER 2019

Darkness has shaped the lives of humans for millennia, and in Dark Skies, author Tiffany Francis travels around Britain and Europe to learn more about nocturnal landscapes and humanity’s connection to the night sky.

Over the course of a year, Tiffany travels through different nightscapes across the UK and beyond. She experiences 24-hour daylight while swimming in the Gulf of Finland and visits Norway to witness the Northern Lights and speak to people who live in darkness for three months each year. She hikes through the haunted yew forests of Kingley Vale, embarks on a nocturnal sail down the River Dart, feeds foxes on a south London estate, and listens to nightjars churring on a Sussex heathland.

As she travels, Tiffany delves into the history of the ancient rituals and seasonal festivals that for thousands of years humans have linked with the light and dark halves of our year. How has our relationship with darkness and the night sky changed over time? How have we used stars and other cosmic phenomena to tell stories about our lives and the land around us? In this beautifully written nature narrative, Tiffany Francis explores nocturnal landscapes and investigates how our experiences of the night-time world have permeated our history, folklore, science, geography, art and literature.

Tiffany Francis is a writer, artist and environmentalist from the South Downs in Hampshire. With a mixed background in the arts, rural heritage and conservation, her work is fuelled by a love for the natural world and a passion for protecting it. She writes and illustrates for national publications and has appeared on BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4. Her first book Food You Can Forage was published in March 2018.

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Mary Costello “The River Capture” OCTOBER 2019

Luke O’Brien has retreated from the city to live a quiet life on his family land situated at the bend of the River Sullane. Surrounded by the Irish countryside and alone in the crumbling house, he longs for a return to his family’s heyday. He has given up on love and relationships and instead turned to books for solace.

One morning a young woman arrives at his door. Her appearance could have profound consequences for him and his family. But will he let her into his closed life?

In a novel that pays glorious homage to Joyce, The River Capture tells of one man’s descent into near madness, and the possibility of rescue. This is a novel about love, loyalty and the raging forces of nature. More than anything, it is a book about the life of the mind and the redemptive powers of art.

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Richard J. King “Ahab’s Rolling Sea: A Natural History of Moby-Dick” OCTOBER 2019

Although Moby-Dick is beloved as one of the most enduring works of American fiction, we rarely consider it a work of nature writing—or even a novel of the sea. Yet Pulitzer Prize– winning author Annie Dillard avers Moby-Dick is the “best book ever written about nature,” and nearly the entirety of the story is set on the waves. In fact, Ishmael’s sea yarn is in conversation with the nature writing of Emerson and Thoreau, and Melville himself did much more than live for a year in a cabin beside a pond. He set sail: to the far remote Pacific Ocean, spending more than three years at sea before writing his masterpiece in 1851.

A revelation for Moby-Dick devotees and neophytes alike, Ahab’s Rolling Sea is a chronological journey through the natural history of Melville’s novel. From white whales to whale intelligence, giant squids, barnacles, albatross, and sharks, Richard J. King examines what Melville knew from his own experiences and the sources available to a reader in the mid-1800s, exploring how and why Melville might have twisted what was known to serve his fiction. King then climbs to the crow’s nest, setting Melville in the context of the American perception of the ocean in 1851—at the very start of the Industrial Revolution and just before the publication of On the Origin of Species. King compares Ahab’s and Ishmael’s worldviews to how we see the ocean today: an expanse still immortal and sublime, but also in crisis. And although the concept of stewardship of the sea would have been foreign to Melville, King argues that Melville’s narrator Ishmael reveals his own tendencies toward what we would now call environmentalism.

Featuring a coffer of illustrations and interviews with contemporary scientists, fishers, and whale watch operators, Ahab’s Rolling Sea offers new insight into a cherished masterwork and our evolving relationship with the briny deep—from whale hunters to climate refugees.

Richard J. King is visiting associate professor of maritime literature and history at the Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He is the author of Lobster and The Devil’s Cormorant: A Natural History.

Ahab’s Rolling Sea is a wide-ranging, highly personal, richly eclectic, and extremely well-researched book whose style and humor, combined with its rigor, suggest the potential for popularity even beyond the fascinations of this self-confessed whalehead. Who could not warm to a chapter titled ‘Gulls, Sea-Ravens, and Albatrosses’ or ‘Sword-Fish and Lively Grounds,’ or be intrigued by ‘Phosphorescence’? There’s a Melvillean romance here, and it sits especially well with King’s love and empathy for human as well as natural history. A contemporary, witty, almost postmodern field guide.” Philip Hoare, author of RISINGTIDEFALLINGSTAR, The Sea InsideLeviathan or, The Whale.

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Sarah Dry “Waters of the World: The Story of the Scientists Who Unraveled the Mysteries of Our Oceans, Atmosphere, and Ice Sheets and Made the Planet Whole” OCTOBER 2019

From the glaciers of the Alps to the towering cumulonimbus clouds of the Caribbean and the unexpectedly chaotic flows of the North Atlantic, Waters of the World is a tour through 150 years of the history of a significant but underappreciated idea: that the Earth has a global climate system made up of interconnected parts, constantly changing on all scales of both time and space. A prerequisite for the discovery of global warming and climate change, this idea was forged by scientists studying water in its myriad forms. This is their story.

Linking the history of the planet with the lives of those who studied it, Sarah Dry follows the remarkable scientists who summited volcanic peaks to peer through an atmosphere’s worth of water vapor, cored mile-thick ice sheets to uncover the Earth’s ancient climate history, and flew inside storm clouds to understand how small changes in energy can produce both massive storms and the general circulation of the Earth’s atmosphere. Each toiled on his or her own corner of the planetary puzzle. Gradually, their cumulative discoveries coalesced into a unified working theory of our planet’s climate.

We now call this field climate science, and in recent years it has provoked great passions, anxieties, and warnings. But no less than the object of its study, the science of water and climate is—and always has been—evolving. By revealing the complexity of this history, Waters of the World delivers a better understanding of our planet’s climate at a time when we need it the most.

Sarah Dry is a writer and historian of science who has immersed herself in the history of meteorology and climate for more than ten years. She is the author of Curie and The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts. Born and raised in Philadelphia, she now lives in Oxford, UK, with her family, and is on the board of the Science Museum Group.

Waters of the World sparkles with lyricism and wit. Dry is a gifted storyteller, and her research into the pre-history of Earth system science has turned up gripping tales of risk, adventure, defiance, and discovery. A unique and important book.” Deborah R. Coen, author of Climate in Motion: Science, Empire, and the Problem of Scale

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Edward Parnell “Ghostland: In Search of a Haunted Country” OCTOBER 2019

What does it mean to be haunted? Why do certain places give us a sense of the uncanny? And should we run from the things that haunt us, or embrace them?

In his late thirties, the ghost story writer Edward Parnell found himself without a family. His parents had died in quick succession in his teens, before his beloved brother succumbed to the same disease years later. In his grief, he turned to his bookshelves.

In Ghostland, Parnell goes in search of the ‘sequestered places’ of the British Isles, our lonely moors, our moss-covered cemeteries, our barren shores and our mysterious and ancient woodlands. At the same time he explores how these places conjured and shaped a kaleidoscopic spectrum of our literature and cinema, from the ghost stories of MR James, Arthur Machen and Algernon Blackwood to Alan Garner and Susan Cooper’s fantasies, from WG Sebald’s The Rings of Saturn and Graham Swift’s Waterland to Robin Hardy’s ‘folk horror’ film The Wicker Man.

Ghostland is an evocative and moving exploration of what haunted these writers and artists, and what is it that is haunting him. It is a unique meditation on grief, memory and longing, and the magical power of stories and nature.

Edward Parnell lives near Norwich and has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia. He has been the recipient of an Escalator Award from Writers’ Centre Norwich and a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship. His novel The Listeners was the winner of the Rethink New Novels Prize. Edward has previously worked for BirdLife International and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, and has written numerous natural history and conservation-related articles for various magazines and newspapers; he has also worked extensively in television and media production, and as a freelance editor and copywriter.

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Mark Carwadline “Handbook of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises” NOVEMBER 2019

This outstanding new handbook to whales, dolphins and porpoises is the most comprehensive, authoritative and up-to-date guide to these popular mammals. With nearly 1,000 accurate illustrations – complete with detailed annotations pointing out the most significant field marks – this new handbook covers all 90 species and every subspecies in the world.

Many of the world’s most respected whale biologists have collaborated on the concise text, which is packed with helpful identification tips from cetacean expert, Mark Carwardine. Mark’s informative text is accompanied by up-to-date distribution maps and photographs for each species. Beautifully designed, to ensure critical information is quickly accessible, this is an indispensable resource that every whale-watcher will want to carry out to sea.

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Kawai Strong Washburn “Sharks in the Time of Saviours” JANURARY 2020

A powerful debut novel that delicately blends Hawaiian myth with the broken American dream. 

In 1994 in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, seven-year-old Nainoa Flores is saved from drowning by a shiver of sharks. His family, struggling to make ends meet amidst the collapse of the sugar cane industry, hails his rescue as a sign of favour from ancient Hawaiian gods.But as time passes, this hope gives way to economic realities, forcing Nainoa and his siblings to seek salvation across the continental United States, leaving behind home and family.With a profound command of language, Washburn’s powerful debut novel examines what it means to be both of a place, and a stranger in it.

Kawai Strong Washburn was born and raised on the Hamakua coast of Hawaii. His short fiction has appeared in McSweeney’s, Electric Literature and The Best American Nonrequired Reading, among others. He has received scholarships from the Tin House and Bread Loaf writer’s workshops and has worked in software and as a climate policy advocate. He lives in California with his wife and daughters. Sharks in the Time of Saviours is his debut novel.